The Child Victims Act in a nutshell, courtesy of Herman Law Firm

Sexual abuse is a continual struggle for American culture, as we continue to cope with the after effects. Sexual abuse can destroy lives, both of the victim and the victim’s loved ones. Many times, the victim is so completely shattered by the trauma of this experience that they will not press any charges against the offender. However, when a victim has the courage to face their attacker in a court of law, its the men and women of law firms that stand beside them. One such saint is Jeff Herman, founder and owner of Herman Law, a firm in Boca Raton, Florida. Herman has become an international name as an advocate for victims of rape, and sexual abuse and/or exploitation. Over the years, Herman has helped countless people, and has become particularly well known for helping children, being trained in methods that help alleviate some pressure off the young victims.
In a recent blog post on the Herman Law website, gazette staff writer Thomas McCarthy highlights the struggle faced by Corey Feldman, actor, and the USA volleyball player Sarah Powers in their continued push for the passing of the Child Victims Act. Specifically, the two are putting pressure on Senate Republicans to pass the act. This bill will eliminate the statutes of limitations in regards to child sex abuse cases in the state of New York in both civil and criminal courts. The current statute for civil court allows for a limit of five years to report the crime and press the charges. After the five years, it is no longer possible to pursue the case. This length of time shortens if the offender is a part of an organization, like a professor in a school or a priest at a church. When it comes to criminal courts, the five year window for pressing charges only applies once the victim has turned eighteen, so he or she has until they are twenty-three to press charges. This bill would eliminate these statutes, allowing for a victim of sexual abuse to have an indefinite amount of time to press charges, whether it is twenty days after the event, or twenty years.
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